Domestic Violence Research Paper Examples

Domestic violence occurs when a current or former intimate partner exerts dominance and control in a relationship through physical, sexual, or psychological-emotional abuse, resulting in physical or emotional trauma to the victim. Other forms of domestic violence include stalking and dating violence. Other terms used for domestic violence include intimate partner violence, domestic abuse, family violence, spousal abuse, dating violence, wife abuse, and battering.

The purpose of creating this list is for students to have available a comprehensive, state-of-the-research, easy-to-read compilation of a wide variety of domestic violence research paper examples.

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Research Paper on Domestic Homicide in New York City

This sample domestic violence research paper is published for educational and informational purposes only. Free research papers, are not written by our writers, they are contributed by users, so we are not responsible for the content of this free sample paper. If you want to buy a high quality research paper on domestic violence at affordable price please use custom research paper writing services. This sample research paper on Domestic Homicide in New York City features 1200 words (16 pages) and a bibliography with 4 sources. Domestic homicide in New York City (NYC) often increases and decreases with the overall rate of homicide and murder of the general population of the city; however, there are differences in the rate and types of domestic homicide in large urban areas such as NYC. Homicide in general in NYC, as in the rest of the United States, began to rise steadily beginning in the early 1960s, reached a peak in the early 1980s, then rose again to another peak in the early 1990s. Then, beginning in the early 1990s, homicide and murder in NYC, as in most other urban centers in the United States, began to decline steadily. According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s annual Uniform Crime Report (UCR), the rate of homicide decreased 64 percent from 1990 to 2002. Criminology experts are continually debating the reasons for this significant crime decrease. Measuring the scope of domestic homicide and proportion and variations with the overall rate of murder is a complex task because of difficulties encountered in categorizing and defining ‘‘domestic homicide.’’ Also, measuring domestic homicide is a relatively new phenomenon because of the relatively recent recognition and acknowledgment of domestic violence as a social problem. This recognition and acknowledgment has placed greater accountability on the police and law enforcement to properly investigate and record domestic violence incidents and prevent future occurrences. Additionally, more resources have become available to domestic violence victims from social services in recent decades, thereby heightening the awareness and subsequently the reporting of domestic violence. These factors make studying and determining long-term trends of domestic violence an onerous task. Although police and law enforcement now have a greater degree of accountability, different police and law enforcement agencies have different definitions of what constitutes ‘‘domestic’’ homicide. Defining domestic homicide in a particular jurisdiction depends on legally defined relations as well as circumstantial, situational, and spatial factors surrounding the criminal incident. Legally defined relations refer to relationships between persons that constitute a ‘‘domestic’’ environment according to the legal code. For example, are domestic violence incidents limited to males and females who are legally married? This traditional relationship is the paradigm of domestic violence (i.e., the abusive male spouse repeatedly assaulting his lawfully wed wife inside their shared dwelling) and ultimately the type of domestic homicide that most persons envision. The inverse of this traditional stereotype is the female spouse ultimately defending herself and murdering her abusive husband out of self-defense or long-suffering post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of the […]

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Research Paper on Domestic Violence by Law Enforcement Officers

This sample domestic violence research paper is published for educational and informational purposes only. Free research papers, are not written by our writers, they are contributed by users, so we are not responsible for the content of this free sample paper. If you want to buy a high quality research paper on domestic violence at affordable price please use custom research paper writing services. This sample research paper on Domestic Violence by Law Enforcement Officers features 4700 words (16 pages), an outline, and a bibliography with 13 sources. Society has now come to the knowledge that domestic violence is a serious preventable crime. Researchers have concluded that domestic violence crosses all socioeconomic classifications. A rich man may beat his wife in the same way that a poor man does. Society also has come to understand that a person in any profession, whether a doctor, lawyer, judge, or even a police officer, may commit an act of domestic violence. By the same token, an individual of any background or profession may also be the victim of domestic violence. However, the issue of domestic violence by law enforcement officers has become a controversial topic among researchers, professionals, and the media, though several researchers have examined the dynamics of domestic violence committed by law enforcement officers. Outline I. Definition of Domestic Violence II. Extent A. Effects on Victims III. Causes of Domestic Violence by Law Enforcement Officers A. Stress B. Personality and Behavior C. Police Culture IV. The Lautenberg Amendment V. Law Enforcement Response to Domestic Violence by Law Enforcement A. Prevention and Training B. Early Warning C. Intervention D. Responsibility E. Incident Response Protocols F. Victim Safety and Protection G. Post-Incident Administrative and Criminal Decisions VI. Conclusion Definition of Domestic Violence No one single definition of domestic violence exists. Different authorities include different forms of violence within their definitions. For the purpose of this entry, ‘‘domestic violence’’ is a broad term that includes threats or violent acts against an existing or former intimate partner. The term ‘‘law enforcement officer,’’ for the purpose of this research paper, refers to a police officer. This is because victims of domestic violence by police officers are in a very different situation than that of other victims of domestic violence. The term ‘‘intimate partner,’’ for the purpose of this research paper, is defined as someone, of the same or opposite sex, with whom the officer has or had a relationship with, including dating, marriage, cohabitation, or parenting/raising a child. This definition is very similar to that used by the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) in their policy on domestic violence by law enforcement (International Association of Chiefs of Police 2003). A serious flaw with the IACP’s policy was its failure to include elder abuse and all forms of child abuse among the forms of domestic violence within its definition. Domestic violence by law enforcement officers includes, but is not limited to, physical, sexual, emotional, and financial abuse. Feminine pronouns will be generally used to indicate […]

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Research Paper on Domestic Violence Courts

This sample domestic violence research paper is published for educational and informational purposes only. Free research papers, are not written by our writers, they are contributed by users, so we are not responsible for the content of this free sample paper. If you want to buy a high quality research paper on domestic violence at affordable price please use custom research paper writing services. This sample research paper on Domestic Violence Courts features 3500 words (11 pages), an outline, and a bibliography with 5 sources. Domestic violence courts are specialized to address the complex issues presented in domestic violence cases. These courts utilize approaches that reflect a significant departure from those of traditional courts. While no single model of a domestic violence court is used by all states, domestic violence courts across the United States share a similar philosophical orientation regarding their role and function. Rather than simply determining facts, applying the law, defending rights, and assigning punishment according to legal rules and procedures, these courts recognize that victim safety is as important as perpetrator accountability. As such, judges and court personnel need to be sensitive to such issues as the risk of future violence to the victim and her children, the victim’s fear and sometimes reluctance to testify, and the need to link victims to services in the community that will help them rebuild their lives, free from violence. This research paper will discuss the formation of domestic violence courts by examining the unique features of domestic violence cases that led to their formation. It will also examine how domestic violence courts differ from traditional courts, especially in terms of their core principles. In addition, this research paper will describe three different models of domestic violence courts, analyzing the advantages and limitations of each. Finally, we will examine the major criticisms of domestic violence courts, focusing on problems with some of the programs typically used by them. Outline I. Unique Characteristics of Domestic Violence Cases II. Core Principles of Domestic Violence Courts III. Models of Domestic Violence Courts IV. Criticisms of Domestic Violence Courts V. Conclusion Unique Characteristics of Domestic Violence Cases Derived from English common law, the American legal system had a long tradition of regarding domestic violence as a private family matter, not subject to criminal prosecution. Early American courts held that husbands acted within their rights when they beat and abused their wives in response to what husbands described as their wives’ ‘‘misbehavior.’’ This view of domestic violence as a private family matter stemmed from a larger body of law and social custom that denied women a separate identity of their own. Indeed, the American legal system did not criminalize domestic violence until the late nineteenth century. It was not until 1871 that a state court, the Supreme Court of Alabama, in Fulgham v. State, determined for the first time that a husband did not have the right to beat his wife. In the years following this decision, several states began adopting laws against domestic violence […]

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Research Paper on Domestic Violence and Education

This sample domestic violence research paper is published for educational and informational purposes only. Free research papers, are not written by our writers, they are contributed by users, so we are not responsible for the content of this free sample paper. If you want to buy a high quality research paper on domestic violence at affordable price please use custom research paper writing services. This sample research paper on Domestic Violence and Education features 2000 words (6 pages) and a bibliography with 4 sources. Domestic violence is an epidemic that knows no boundaries and does not discriminate based upon religion, race, or even gender. Throughout the years scholars and practitioners have learned more about the epidemic and have become aware of some risk factors that may increase an individual’s chance of being a domestic violence victim. Recognizing the risk factors has become helpful in the attempt to identify those individuals who are more at risk than others. These factors are not intended to serve as a definition of who or what domestic violence victims can and cannot be. It is extremely important to keep in mind that anyone can be a victim of domestic violence regardless of whether or not she or he meets the characteristics identified as risk factors within this research paper. Throughout the years researchers have made significant strides concerning domestic violence. They have studied many risk factors that practitioners can now use to successfully identify victims of domestic violence. The ability to recognize these factors has proven valuable to the many professionals who come into contact with victims of domestic violence because it helps them properly identify victims and provide them with the assistance they need. Studying risk factors also allows domestic violence experts to learn more about the phenomenon and develop better ways to address this problem. In addition to identifying risk factors, this research has helped identify protective factors associated with the prevention of domestic violence. The discovery of both risk and protective factors will lead to further research that will help professionals better understand this epidemic and find new ways of managing it. One of the risk factors associated with domestic violence is being female. Research has indicated that females are more likely to be victims of domestic violence than males. This does not mean that men cannot be victims; it simply means that women are more often victims than men. Furthermore, much of the research conducted concerning domestic violence has focused on heterosexual couples, though domestic violence is something that can and does affect anyone, regardless of sexual orientation or gender. Another risk factor associated with domestic violence is being a minority female. This does not mean that whites or minority males cannot be victims of domestic violence. The risk factor of race simply indicates that minority women are victimized at higher rates than their white counterparts. A third risk factor associated with domestic violence is the discrepancy between education, income, or occupational status between partners. In 2003 a study conducted by […]

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Research Paper on Electronic Monitoring of Abusers

This sample domestic violence research paper is published for educational and informational purposes only. Free research papers, are not written by our writers, they are contributed by users, so we are not responsible for the content of this free sample paper. If you want to buy a high quality research paper on domestic violence at affordable price please use custom research paper writing services. This sample research paper on Electronic Monitoring of Abusers features 3700 words (11 pages), an outline, and a bibliography with 12 sources. Battered women who appeal to the justice system for help are at heightened risk for abuse. To better protect domestic violence victims during the postcomplaint period, some jurisdictions use electronic monitoring (EM) technology to supervise alleged and convicted batterers and to notify victims when they may be in danger. This technology provides crime control capability through varying degrees of surveillance and tracking of offenders and through alerting devices for victims, law enforcement, and community corrections agencies. Outline I. Background II. Research Findings III. Contact Deterrence IV. Bilateral Electronic Monitoring as an Alternative to the Battered Women’s Shelter V. The Temporary Nature of Bilateral Electronic Monitoring VI. The Role of Human Supervision in Bilateral Electronic Monitoring Programs VII. Life on the Box: The Controlled Party’s Perspective VIII. Bilateral Electronic Monitoring for Domestic Violence as Diversion IX. Conclusion Background The criminal justice system’s use of EM (also referred to as ‘‘electronic tagging’’) has grown steadily since its adoption by the courts in the mid- 1980s (Vollum and Hale 2002: 2).EM has traditionally been used as an alternative to incarceration (‘‘house arrest’’), as an intermediate sanction (e.g., as part of intensive probation), or as a condition of release from jail (i.e., as a form of pretrial supervision). EM has historically been deployed in the context of noninterpersonal offenses, including drunk driving and drug- and property-related crimes (Crowe, Sydney, Bancroft, and Lawrence 2002; Vollum and Hale 2002). However, courts have increasingly applied EM in response to interpersonal offenses, including cases involving charges of sexual abuse and domestic violence. When administered in an interpersonal offense context, where one party is controlled or supervised via monitoring and a second party is protected from, or alerted to potentially untoward movement by, a potential abuser, EM is best considered ‘‘bilateral’’ rather than ‘‘unilateral’’ (Erez, Ibarra, and Lurie 2004). Such bilateral programs combine EM associated with home incarceration, originally intended to safeguard the general public, with individuated protection for specific victims named in pending or adjudicated cases (Erez and Ibarra 2006). Here, bilateral electronic monitoring (BEM) is used, not only to enforce liberty restrictions in the absence of traditional detention or incarceration, but also to monitor defendants’ observance of ‘‘exclusion zones’’ around a complaining party’s home, building an ‘‘accountability’’ mechanism into a judge’s orders. BEM typically operates on one of two technological platforms: radio frequency (RF) and global positioning system (GPS). RF-based BEM programs for domestic violence generally work as follows: As with a traditional ‘‘home detention’’ system, the offender is equipped with […]

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Research Paper on Exchange Theory of Family Violence

This sample domestic violence research paper is published for educational and informational purposes only. Free research papers, are not written by our writers, they are contributed by users, so we are not responsible for the content of this free sample paper. If you want to buy a high quality research paper on domestic violence at affordable price please use custom research paper writing services. This sample research paper on Exchange Theory of Family Violence features: 2300 words (8 pages) and a bibliography with 12 sources. An exchange theory of family violence is derived from the assumptions and propositions of social exchange theory (Blau 1964; Homans 1961; Thibault and Kelley 1959) and control theory (Hirschi 1969). The assumptions, concepts, and propositions of exchange theory are designed to explain all forms of intimate and family violence, ranging from corporal punishment to homicide and including violence and abusive acts in all intimate relationships. The exchange approach to human behavior has a long history in both sociology and anthropology (Nye 1979). The key assumptions of the exchange perspective are: Social behavior is a series of exchanges. In the course of these exchanges, individuals attempt to maximize their rewards and minimize their costs. Under certain circumstances, a person will accept certain costs in exchange for other rewards. When one receives rewards from others, one is obliged to reciprocate and supply benefits to them in return (from Homans 1961; Blau 1964; Nye 1979). The key concepts used by exchange theorists are rewards, costs, and reciprocity. Rewards are defined as pleasures, satisfactions, and gratifications (Thibault and Kelley 1959). Rewards also include gains in status, relationships, interaction, experiences other than interaction, and feelings that provide gratification to people (Nye 1979: 2). Costs are defined as any loss in status, loss of a relationship or milieu, or feeling disliked by an individual or group (Nye 1979: 2). There are two types of costs: (1) punishments and (2) losing out on some reward because another alternative was chosen (missing a good movie because you chose to go to a concert). Reciprocity is the key to social exchange. In brief, people are expected to help those who help them and not injure them (Gouldner 1960). Outline I. Control Theory II. Applying Exchange Theory to Family Violence III. The Key Proposition A. Intimacy B. Privacy C. Inequality IV. Derived Propositions V. Tests of Exchange Theory Control Theory The assumptions and propositions of control theory were developed and defined by Hirschi (1969) to explain deviant behavior. Hirschi begins with the assumption that most people are tempted from time to time to engage in deviant behavior—including violence. For Hirschi, the central question is not ‘‘Why do people engage in deviant acts?’’ but rather, ‘‘Why do people conform most of the time?’’ From this assumption, Hirschi develops the following propositions (which were originally developed to explain delinquent behavior): The more attached people are to family, friends, and neighbors, the more involved they are in socially approved activities (e.g., school and work); and the stronger their […]

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Research Paper on Expert Testimony in Domestic Violence Cases

This sample domestic violence research paper is published for educational and informational purposes only. Free research papers, are not written by our writers, they are contributed by users, so we are not responsible for the content of this free sample paper. If you want to buy a high quality research paper on domestic violence at affordable price please use custom research paper writing services. This sample research paper on Expert Testimony in Domestic Violence Cases features: 930 words (3 pages) and a bibliography with 7 sources. Introduction Many people have seen an ‘‘expert witness’’ in a courtroom or at the scene of a crime on a variety of television shows. These popular shows depict a highly educated and sophisticated expert with several degrees, including a Ph.D., who has all the answers. These shows portray both the reality and the fantasy of expert witnesses and their role in the judicial system. This research paper will discuss the history of the use of expert witnesses, admissibility of expert opinions, and types of expert testimony. The final section will discuss the use of expert witnesses in domestic violence situations. History The use of expert witnesses in the courtroom to assist law enforcement officials dates back to the Salem, Massachusetts, witch trials of 1692, when a Doctor Brown first testified in a heresy trial. He informed the court that in his medical opinion, the defendant had bewitched the victims. From this dubious beginning, the use of expert witnesses has grown in both criminal and civil cases to include any relevant topic that is beyond the ordinary knowledge of everyday jurors. In both civil and criminal cases, the justice system has come to depend on expert witnesses. For example, in 1996 there were 110 crime laboratories in the United States. By 1976 there were 240 active crime lab facilities, and in 1992 that figure increased to over 345 labs. This explosive growth of forensic facilities has not occurred without complications. Some personnel in these laboratories have incorrectly identified various physical items, including hair samples, blood typing, and bullets. The overwhelming majority of these facilities, however, have performed painstaking analyses that have assisted law enforcement agencies in their pursuit of finding the truth. Admission of Expert Testimony Frye vs. United States (1923) was the first major case that dealt with scientific evidence presented by expert witnesses. The Court of Appeals determined that the admission of expert testimony regarding a systolic blood pressure deception test was unacceptable. The ruling was based on the rationale that the test had not gained enough general acceptance or standing among physiological and psychological authorities. Thus the first guideline for admissibility of expert testimony is: The source from which the witness’s scientific deduction is made must be sufficiently established to have gained general acceptance in the particular field in which it belongs. Rule 702 of the Federal Rules of Evidence further details the guidelines that should be used in determining the admissibility of expert testimony. It states that expert testimony must assist […]

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Research Paper on Men as Domestic Violence Victims

This sample domestic violence research paper is published for educational and informational purposes only. Free research papers, are not written by our writers, they are contributed by users, so we are not responsible for the content of this free sample paper. If you want to buy a high quality research paper on domestic violence at affordable price please use custom research paper writing services. This sample research paper on Men as Domestic Violence Victims features: 4000 words (12 pages) and a bibliography with 9 sources. Each year thousands of innocent men are victims of violence in their own homes. Domestic violence is an established fact for these men, whether their partner is a man or a woman. These men suffer the same type of assaults as women victims, in roughly the same or greater proportion, and yet they are far less likely to report their victimization than women. What makes these men so reluctant to report their abusers? For many men in abusive relationships, their reasons for staying, and for not reporting the violence, are tightly enmeshed. They are also very similar to the reasons given by women in abusive relationships. They are in love with their abusers. They hope the abusers will change. They believe that they have done something wrong which warrants this treatment. They fear losing their partners, children, homes, friends, etc. Male victims of domestic violence are, however, different in significant ways from female victims. In addition to the issues they have in common with female victims, there are particular issues unique to male victims. The lack of attention paid to these issues is the biggest hindrance to helping male victims of domestic violence. Outline I. Fear Issues II. Masculinity Issues III. Emotional Issues IV. Image Issues V. Legal Issues VI. Where Would the Male Victim Go? VII. Conclusion Fear Issues Fear is one of the major deterrents to reporting domestic violence among both women and men. Both genders fear that the police will not help them. Both also fear that calling the police will make things worse. They fear that their abusers will become even angrier and will return from police custody to abuse them more severely. Men have special fear issues not generally shared by women. These include the fear that they themselves will be arrested by police. The police may believe that the woman accused of abuse was violent only in self-defense. This fear is more likely to turn into a reality if the man has used physical force to defend himself. Any mark he may have left on a woman batterer as he acted in self-defense—for example, from holding her off or shoving her away—may be perceived as evidence that he was the batterer and she was defending herself. If this scenario should actually happen to the man, he is even less likely to report future violence. For a man in a homosexual relationship, calling the police about his victimization brings with it the risk of maltreatment and disbelief from a homophobic […]

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Research Paper on Fatality Reviews in Cases of Domestic Violence

This sample domestic violence research paper is published for educational and informational purposes only. Free research papers, are not written by our writers, they are contributed by users, so we are not responsible for the content of this free sample paper. If you want to buy a high quality research paper on domestic violence at affordable price please use custom research paper writing services. This sample research paper on Fatality Reviews in Cases of Domestic Violence features: 3000 words (10 pages) and a bibliography with 9 sources. Introduction The reviewing of cases of domestic-violence related deaths commenced in a handful of U.S. states beginning in the early 1990s. As of 2005, roughly thirty-five states conduct what have become known as fatality reviews. The term fatality review refers to the identification and analysis of cases of adult homicide and suicide where one or more parties die due to domestic violence. Reviewers seek to prevent further deaths, injuries, and abuse from domestic violence by suggesting and perhaps introducing preventive strategies involving service providers and community members at large. Reviews differ greatly by community and jurisdiction. Many reviews report aggregate statistical data or summary demographic details. Others dig deeply into fatalities, exploring the multiple and often hidden compromises faced by victims of domestic violence. A number of review teams combine both quantitative and qualitative approaches, bringing both depth and breadth to their deliberations. Case Selection Fatality review teams typically do not review all deaths caused by, related to, or somehow traceable to domestic violence. Rather, they select cases for review based upon the impact of the case on the community, the legal difficulties associated with reviewing a particular case, the resources of the team, and the potential the case might have for identifying innovative preventive strategies. Teams recognize that various types of cases qualify for review. Roughly 1,000 to 1,600 people per year die in the United States as a result of intimate partner homicide. Men kill female intimates in anywhere from two-thirds to three-quarters of intimate partner homicides. In one-quarter to one-third of these cases, females kill intimate male partners. The vast majority of male perpetrators kill females after a long, highly stylized, and escalating pattern of woman battering. Conversely, women typically kill male intimates under circumstances in which their male partners have battered them, often over long periods of time. Although fatality review teams have traditionally paid more attention to the deaths of women than the deaths of men, both sets of cases display similar background characteristics and invite comparable intervention strategies. Fatality review teams and researchers often distinguish between ‘‘single’’ and ‘‘multiple’’ forms of intimate partner homicide. In the former, the offender kills only the intimate partner. In the latter, the perpetrator kills the intimate partner and then commits suicide (homicide suicide) or kills the intimate partner and a number of family members, and then commits suicide (familicide). Men commit nearly all homicide suicides and familicides. Homicide suicide cases are particularly amenable to fatality review because there is usually no […]

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Research Paper on Female Suicide and Domestic Violence

This sample domestic violence research paper is published for educational and informational purposes only. Free research papers, are not written by our writers, they are contributed by users, so we are not responsible for the content of this free sample paper. If you want to buy a high quality research paper on domestic violence at affordable price please use custom research paper writing services. This sample research paper on Female Suicide and Domestic Violence features: 1000 words (3 pages) and a bibliography with 9 sources. Introduction Domestic violence is a factor in up to one-quarter of female suicide attempts. Female victims of domestic violence have eight times the risk for suicide compared with the general population. Fifty percent of battered women who attempt suicide undertake subsequent attempts. Married females experience lower suicide rates compared with single females; however, if domestic violence is present in the marriage, the risk of suicide increases. If a pregnant woman is a victim of domestic violence, the risk of suicide increases. One in twelve pregnant women experience battering such as hits to the abdomen, breasts, or genitals, while 20 percent of pregnant female victims of domestic violence attempt suicide. Many female victims of domestic violence indicate that their rate of victimization increased when they became pregnant. Along with domestic violence, the prior loss of a child by miscarriage or a desire for abortion also increase suicidal tendencies. Research shows that in addition to married and pregnant women, young girls experiencing domestic violence also have increased rates of suicide. Risk Factors Various risk factors relate to suicidality among female domestic violence victims. Most obviously, the physical and psychological abuse by a partner may trigger suicidal thoughts. However, other underlying factors are relevant, which concern individual and social issues. Regarding individual issues, research alludes to genetic factors involving family histories of suicide, and points to problems involving mental disorders, including aspects of anxiety, nervous breakdowns, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Depression and posttraumatic stress may be results of ongoing abuse from a partner or lingering aftereffects of a trauma occurring years earlier. For example, some battered females with suicidal tendencies indicate that they still deal with the psychological effects of sexual, emotional, or physical maltreatment experienced as a child. Combined with factors of low esteem, these psychological effects can trigger suicidal thoughts when victims blame themselves for their abuse. Regarding social issues, research emphasizes the importance of social bonds. Following sociological models of suicides, research shows that females in domestic violence situations are more likely to attempt suicide when low levels of social support exist. This includes friends and family networks. With all factors, the likelihood of suicide increases when victims use drugs as a coping mechanism. Shifting Shame Another motivation for female suicide in domestic violence situations involves a shift of shame. Here, the embarrassment of abuse causes battered women to fail to seek help from others. The suicide represents a transfer of shame to the victimizer or others in the battered woman’s social network who […]

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