History Research Paper Examples

This collection of history research paper examples have been designed to serve as model papers for most popular historical topics. Each research paper covers the topic in a comprehensive manner and to provides a perspective that students might find to be unique.

The purpose of creating this list is for students to have available a comprehensive, state-of-the-research, easy-to-read compilation of a wide variety of history research paper examples. Our focus on essentials has meant covering fairly broad areas in the discipline, rather than specific research paper topics. In our view, this broad focus would be most useful to students.

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Zhu Yuanzhang Research Paper

This sample Zhu Yuanzhang Research Paper is published for educational and informational purposes only. Free research papers are not written by our writers, they are contributed by users, so we are not responsible for the content of this free sample paper. If you want to buy a high quality research paper on history topics at affordable price please use custom research paper writing services. Zhu Yuanzhang rose from a life of suffering and adversity to become one of the most powerful and autocratic emperors in Chinese history. His thirty-year reign as founder of the Ming dynasty (1368–1644) was characterized by two radical policies: the most far-reaching, innovative agrarian reforms prior to those of Mao Zedong in the mid-twentieth century; and a despotic control of government characterized by bloodthirsty and terrifying purges. Zhu Yuanzhang, the founding emperor of the Ming (Bright or Radiant) dynasty (1368–1644), reigned from 1368 to 1398 with the reign title Hongwu (Vast Military Power); his posthumous abbreviated title is Taizu (Grand Progenitor). Zhu Yuanzhang was the third son of an impoverished peasant family living in Haozhou County along the Huai River in present-day Anhui Province. When he was a teenager, a combination of drought and plague carried off his parents and oldest brother, leaving him destitute. Neighbors helped him find refuge at a Buddhist temple, where he became a monk. But after a few weeks the temple ran out of food and he was forced to leave and go begging in the countryside. For three years the famished and unprepossessing youth roamed around east central China observing the effects of famine and dynastic breakdown on farming people. During that time he became associated with the subversive Red Turban movement, whose goal was the overthrow of the Mongol Yuan dynasty (1279–1368). He then returned to his temple and worked on improving his reading and writing skills. In 1352, when government forces burned down the temple, he joined a Red Turban rebel unit. Rising rapidly through the ranks, he assembled a fighting force and branched out on his own. He developed a base in the lower Yangzi (Chang) River region and in 1356 captured the strategic city now called Nanjing. During this period of civil war Zhu built up his armed forces, attracted scholars to his side, and established himself as an imperial contender. Thanks to growing popular support and outstanding military aides he was able to defeat all other claimants and become the only supreme ruler in Chinese history to rise to power from a destitute background. In 1368 he declared himself emperor. Before the year was out his forces had driven the Mongol rulers out of their capital (present-day Beijing) and sent them fleeing back to Mongolia. Emperor Zhu established a harsh but powerful autocracy. He had risen to the top through military power and iron discipline. He recognized the need to rely on the educated elite to install a civilian regime. But as a once destitute peasant he maintained a seething distrust of such people, and as a contender for power […]

Great Zimbabwe Research Paper

This sample Great Zimbabwe Research Paper is published for educational and informational purposes only. Free research papers are not written by our writers, they are contributed by users, so we are not responsible for the content of this free sample paper. If you want to buy a high quality research paper on history topics at affordable price please use custom research paper writing services. The state of Great Zimbabwe flourished circa 1290 to 1450 in southern Africa. The ruins of its capital, which was built from massive walls of stone, reflect the grandeur and exquisite workmanship of the original. The state was ruled by a small political elite that also controlled networks in the Indian Ocean trading economy as an exporter of gold. Visitors to the ruins of the former capital of Great Zimbabwe, a state that flourished in southern Africa from approximately 1290 to 1450, may be struck by two observations. First, the impressive stone structures emerging from the savanna still convey the former wealth and importance of the site. In the local language, Shona, zimbabwe means “houses built of stone,” and there are many zimbabwe in the region, in particular in the area bounded by the Limpopo River in the south and the Zambezi River in the north. Great Zimbabwe thus represents a prominent example of political power and architecture; in fact it was the largest stone structure in Africa south of the Sahara built before European colonization in the late nineteenth century. While having only extended across a fraction of what today is the national territory, its legacy is so important that in 1980 the newly independent country was named Zimbabwe, and the image of an artifact, the stone-carved Zimbabwe bird, of which eight were found at the site, became part of the national flag. Second, a visitor not too familiar with the history of Great Zimbabwe is likely to be surprised by the artifacts exhibited at the museum on site. These range from locally produced tools to luxury items from the Indian Ocean rim, such as glass beads from India and porcelain from China. Despite Great Zimbabwe’s location several weeks’ march by foot from the coast, the political centralization that led to its formation was based on its links with the Indian Ocean economy, exporting gold in exchange for cotton cloth and luxury items. Origins Great Zimbabwe’s cultural achievements, wealth, and economic success, expressed in its stone architecture, so gravely contradict prejudiced notions of the African past that since the 1870s, a range of European travelers, archaeologists, and historians, have attributed them to outsiders. In particular, the white-settler regime during the colonial period (1890–1980) claimed that some allegedly superior civilization, such as the ancient Egyptians or the Phoenicians, must have been responsible. Ironically, however, already in the early twentieth century, archaeologists had proved that local Shona-speaking people had built the city. As is the case elsewhere with agricultural societies, the origins of Great Zimbabwe as a centralized political state lie in its participation in long-distance trade networks, which generated sufficient wealth […]

Zionism Research Paper

This sample Zionism Research Paper is published for educational and informational purposes only. Free research papers are not written by our writers, they are contributed by users, so we are not responsible for the content of this free sample paper. If you want to buy a high quality research paper on history topics at affordable price please use custom research paper writing services. Zionism is a movement to establish a homeland for Jews who have been scattered throughout Europe. The word Zion refers to the land promised to the Jews by God in the Bible, but the activity of Zionism is almost exclusively political, rather than religious, because of Jews’ understanding that the land is not to be inhabited until the coming of their Messiah. The need for a Jewish homeland began in 70 CE with the destruction of the second Temple of Jerusalem by the Romans. Since that time Jews have lived as a minority group in many countries. Despite the diversity of cultural settings and political regimes during the centuries, they have been able to maintain their ethnic, religious, and linguistic characteristics. Because of their strong nationalistic identity, they have been subjected to prejudice—known as “anti-Semitism”— and even persecution in many of the countries to which they have migrated. As a result, the primary aim of Zionists has been to find a homeland (preferably in the Jewish ancestral home of Palestine) where they can gain political independence, develop Hebrew as the spoken language, and provide a community for Jews who have been dispersed for centuries. Writers during the nineteenth century spread Zionist ideas throughout Europe. Moses Hess wrote two works outlining the return of Jews to Palestine, Rome and Jerusalem (1862) and Plan for the Colonization of the Holy Land (1867). Leo Pinsker wrote in his pamphlet Auto-Emancipation (1882) that “The Jews are not a living nation; they are everywhere aliens; therefore they are despised . . . The proper and only remedy would be the creation of a Jewish nationality . . . a home of their own.” Theodor Herzl (1860–1904), an Austrian journalist, moved to the forefront of the movement with the organization of the first Zionist Congress at Basel, Switzerland, in 1897. Delegates at the congress called for a publicly recognized Jewish home in Palestine. During the remainder of his life Herzl negotiated with world leaders to gain support for the Zionist movement. In 1903 the British government offered a large tract of land in Uganda, East Africa, for a Jewish homeland. Herzl promoted this idea to the Zionist Congress in 1903 as a “temporary haven” for Jews. Delegates at the congress strongly opposed the idea and remained committed to Palestine as the only sanctuary for Jews scattered throughout the world. Herzl died in 1904, but his contributions to the movement earned him the title of the “Father of Modern Zionism.” Between 1881 and 1903 the first modern migration of Jews to Palestine established a small but influential presence. The first group of settlers was known as “Chovevei Zion” (Lovers […]

Zoroastrianism Research Paper

This sample Zoroastrianism Research Paper is published for educational and informational purposes only. Free research papers are not written by our writers, they are contributed by users, so we are not responsible for the content of this free sample paper. If you want to buy a high quality research paper on history topics at affordable price please use custom research paper writing services. Zoroaster was a Persian prophet who taught that rival gods—one good, one evil—struggled for control of the world. He called on his followers to support the good and promised them eternal life after the fiery end of the world. Today about two hundred thousand Zoroastrians remain in Iran, India, and North America. Zoroastrian dualism survives in concepts of hell and the devil as formulated in the Christian and Muslim religions. Zoroastrianism is the ancient religion of the Iranian people. The prophet of this religion is Zarathushtra (Greek form Zoroaster), who lived approximately 1000 BCE in eastern Persia. The religion of the Iranians was closely related to that of the Indians who had immigrated to the Indus region. The Indo-Iranian religion was polytheistic and included two groups of deities, the Ahuras and the Daivas. Zoroaster reformed the old Indo-Iranian religion and made one group of these deities the beneficent ones (Ahuras), and another maleficent (Daivas). Among the Ahuras, one named Ahura Mazda (Wise Lord) was made supreme and the creator of the world and all that is good. Ahura Mazda was aided by a group of deities who act as his aspects or his archangels. While they were not a fixed number during the time of the prophet, they include Khshathra (Dominion); Haurvatat (Health); Spenta Armaiti (Devotion); Ameretat (Immortality); Vohu Manah (Good Thought); Asha (Truth/Order); and Spenta Mainyu (Holy Spirit). Ahura Mazda is opposed by a host of fallen deities, the Daivas, who remained supreme in the Indic religion. For of each of Ahura Mazda archangels a deadly and maleficent demon was created to bring death and destruction to the world. These Daivas are headed by Angra Mainyu (Ahriman), which can be translated as Evil Spirit. It is the Daivas who attempt to destabilize the universal order (arta) and are in constant battle with the Ahuras. According to Zoroaster’s own words, people have the freedom of will to choose with a clear mind between the two sides, but if one chooses to be on the side of the Daivas and Angra Mainyu, he or she will suffer at the time of renovation (end of time) and will be placed in the Zoroastrian hell, which is dark and full of stench. But if one chooses on the side of Ahura Mazda, he or she will be prosperous and at the end of time will remain in the house of songs and best existence, that is, heaven. This is the first time in history that we find these concepts set forth, which later influenced Abrahamic religions when the Achaemenid Persian Empire ruled over Asia and the eastern Mediterranean. The prophecies of Zoroaster […]